Pretoria University Law Press (PULP)

PULP is an open-access publisher based at the Centre for Human Rights, University of Pretoria

Strengthening the protection of sexual and reproductive health and rights in the African region through human rights

Strengthening the protection of sexual and reproductive health and rights in the African region through human rights
Edited by Charles Ngwena and Ebenezer Durojaye
2014
ISSN: 978-1-920538-31-6
Pages: 355
Print version: Available
Electronic version: Free PDF available

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About the publication

Strengthening the protection of sexual and reproductive health and rights in the African region through human rights uses rights-based frameworks to address some of the serious sexual and reproductive health challenges that the African region is currently facing. More importantly, the book provides insightful human rights approaches on how these challenges can be overcome. The book is the first of its kind. It is an important addition to the resources available to researchers, academics, policymakers, civil society organisations, human rights defenders, learners and other persons interested in the subject of sexual and reproductive health and rights as they apply to the African region. Human rights issues addressed by the book include: access to safe abortion and emergency obstetric care; HIV/AIDS; adolescent sexual health and rights; early marriage; and gender-based sexual violence.

About the editors:

Charles Ngwena is Professor, Department of Constitutional Law and Legal Philosophy, Faculty of Law, University of the Free State, South Africa
Ebenezer Durojaye is Associate Professor of Law and Head of the Socio-economic Rights Project at the Community Law Centre, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town


Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

  • Foreword:
    Commissioner Soyata Maiga (Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Women in Africa)

INTRODUCTION

  • 1. Strengthening the protection of sexual and reproductive health and rights in the African region through human rights: An introduction
    Charles Ngwena and Ebenezer Durojaye

PART I: REPRODUCTIVE AUTONOMY, ACCESS TO SAFE ABORTION AND EMERGENCY OBSTETRIC CARE

  • 2. Reducing abortion-related maternal mortality in Africa: Progress in implementing Objective 5 of the Maputo Plan of Action on Sexual and Reproductive Health Rights
    Eunice Brookman-Amissah and Tinyade Kachika
  • 3. Access to legal abortion for rape as a reproductive health right: A commentary on the abortion regimes of Swaziland and Ethiopia
    Simangele Mavundla and Charles Ngwena
  • 4. Abortion and the European Convention on Human Rights: A lens for abortion advocacy in Africa
    Christina Zampas and Jaime Todd-Gher
  • 5. Accountability for non-fulfilment of human rights obligations: A key strategy for reducing maternal mortality and disability in sub-Saharan Africa
    Onyema Afulukwe-Eruchalu

Part II: HIV/AIDS FOCUS

  • 6. Adolescent girls, HIV, and state obligations under the African Women’s Rights Protocol
    Karen Stefiszyn
  • 7. Advancing a feminist capabilities approach to HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa
    Rebecca Amollo
  • 8. The right to health and AIDS medicines in sub-Saharan Africa: Assessing the outcomes of a human rights-based approach to medicines
    Lisa Forman

PART III: SEXUAL AND REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS: INTERSECTIONS WITH ADOLESCENCE, EARLY MARRIAGE, GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE AND POVERTY

  • 9. Sexual health and rights of adolescents: A dialogue with sub-Saharan Africa
    Godfrey Kangaude and Tiffany Banda
  • 10. Promoting sexual and reproductive rights through legislative interventions: A case study of child rights legislation and early marriage in Nigeria and Ethiopia
    Ayodele Atsenuwa
  • 11. Gaps in gender-based violence jurisprudence of international and hybrid criminal courts: Can human rights law help?
    Susana Sácouto
  • 12. Women, sexual rights and poverty: Framing the linkage under the African human rights system
    Fana Hagos Berhane

Contributors


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